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Theatre Department ends season with laughs, fun

Shararay, played by Kassidy Newton (from left), and Mickey, played by Jake McDonald, finish a number about aliens coming to Earth in the play “High School Musi-Pocalypse” as Alejandra, played by Sami Kirkland, looks on in disbelief. The one-act play was performed by members of the Jackson High School Theatre Department at the Rufus Adams Auditorium on Tuesday, May 14.

Shararay, played by Kassidy Newton (from left), and Mickey, played by Jake McDonald, finish a number about aliens coming to Earth in the play “High School Musi-Pocalypse” as Alejandra, played by Sami Kirkland, looks on in disbelief. The one-act play was performed by members of the Jackson High School Theatre Department at the Rufus Adams Auditorium on Tuesday, May 14.

Members of the Jackson High School Theatre Department took the stage for the last time in the 2012-2013 school year with the presentation of two one-act, comedy plays.

On Tuesday, May 14, the Rufus Adams Auditorium was filled with laughter from the audience as students performed “Law and Order: Fairy Tale Unit,” directed by theater/choral teacher Stephen Crocker, and “High School Musi-Pocalypse,” directed by theater/speech teacher Megan Rose-Houchins.

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In the Jackson High School Theatre Department’s production of “Law and Order: Fairy Tale Unit,” the Three Pigs, played by Alexa Adcock (from left), Avery Torrence and Christen Davis, look nervous as they stand on the witness stand in court.

The two one-act plays were a “fun way” to end the JHS Theatre Department’s season, Crocker said.

In “Law and Order: Fairy Tale Unit,” the play takes a bit from each genre — TV cop dramas and children’s books — to tell a funny story about how the Three Pigs framed Bernard Bartholomew Wolfe, aka the Big Bad Wolf.

Fairy Tale Police Department detectives H.D. (Humpty Dumpty), played by Devon Watson, and Cindy (Cinderella), played by Megan Conley, try to solve cases involving the destruction of two of the Three Pigs’ houses. Both houses — one made of straw, the other out of sticks — were destroyed by wind.

Enter Bernard Bartholomew Wolfe, played by Brianna Strickland, with Peep (Little Bo Peep), played by Kimberly Gabriel, as her attorney.

The detectives interview witnesses that include the Seven Dwarfs, Jack and Jill, Pinocchio and Hansel and Gretel.

Then, in a bizarre twist, the prosecution, A.D.A. Stiltskin, played by Veronica Camacho, cracks the case wide open. The Three Pigs — No. 1 with an accent like Fran Drescher, played by Alexa Adcock; No. 2 with a Southern accent, played by Avery Torrence and No. 3 with a British accent, played by Christen Davis — destroyed their own houses.

It turns out, after blowing their inheritance money on gambling in Las Vegas, funding a failed pop star’s career and buying a windproof condominium, the Three Pigs were desperate for money.

The parody “High School Musi-Pocalypse” puts the Disney smash hit TV movie “High School Musical” on its ear. The play opens with the song “We’re All in This Together” from the original movie, but takes a creative detour after that.

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Members of the Jackson High School Theatre Department perform the opening number in the one-act parody “High School Musi-Pocalypse” at the Rufus Adams Auditorium on Tuesday, May 14. The play poked fun at the Disney TV movie “High School Musical.”

The play is still about a group of high school students preparing for a musical production, only this group is way zanier. It’s actually a play within a play that pokes fun at the Disney movie.

The students try to top the previous year’s musical about field nurses in the Civil War by creating an apocalyptic tale based on the Mayan Calendar prediction of the end of the world. Their solution is to use a large spaceship to move to another planet.

The students have to be careful how they write their parody, however. A lawyer, played by Lacey Little wearing mouse ears with a polka dot bow, hounds them about copyright infringement. “The mouse is not to be trifled with,” she says. The lawyer is relentless until the students promise her a part in the play.

Cory, played by Sam Elliot, Alejandra, played by Sami Kirkland, Shararay, played by Kassidy Newton and Mickey, played by Jake McDonald are vying for the two male and female leading roles of the musical.

JHS senior Newton has a strong resemblance to Ashley Tisdale, who played Sharpay in the Disney movie.

And, just like in the original movie, Cory is a high school basketball star and Alejandra is a beautiful brainiac. Their friends and family do not want them to participate in a musical — or to date each other.

Cory’s father, played by Josh Acoff, tells him, “Do you think Lebron James sings?” And one of Alejandra’s academic decathlon teammates tells her, “Einstein was never in a musical.”

In the end, though, Cory and Alejandra’s relationship opens up the minds of the other students and brings peace to the high school — just in time to plan and produce a killer musical, with aliens.